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Why to Give

  • It's an investment for the future of us all.
  • All proceeds go directly to promising young scientists through ARCS Scholar Awards.
  • Donations are tax dedutible as provided in Section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

How to Give

Use your credit card to donate directly to the chapter  or  via PayPal's giving fund  . (A PayPal account is not required.)

Mail your check to ARCS Foundation Honolulu Chapter, P.O. Box 10052, Honolulu, HI 96816

Add to the ARCS Honolulu Scholar Award   endowment at the University of Hawai‘i Foundation.

For More Information

on sponsoring a named ARCS Scholar Award, remembering ARCS Foundation in your will or becoming a member or friend of ARCS Foundation Honolulu Chapter, email ARCS Foundation Honolulu Chapter at arcshonolulu@gmail.com, or contact:

Honolulu Chapter President Wendy Lagareta
lagaretaw@gmail.com |  (808) 386-5330
Membership Director Patricia (Patty) Lee
leed089@hawaii.rr.com  |  (808) 230-0133
   

ARCS Foundation Honolulu Chapter is a 501 (c)(3) charitable nonprofit organization, taxpayer ID 51-0183563

On Deep-Sea Oceanography

Dr. Amy Baco-Taylor onboard research ship

“Because most species in the deep sea are slow growing and long-lived, deep-sea species are actually more vulnerable to human impacts than many shallow-water ecosystems.”

– 1999 Honolulu ARCS Scholar Dr. Amy Baco-Taylor, explaining the importance of her research on deep sea ecosystems in a Q&A on the Florida State University website where she is now a professor in the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science. Read the profile

Scholar Matsuda Wins Prestigious Coral Conservation Fellowship

Shayle Matsuda at ocean overlook“The increasing frequency and severity of global coral bleaching events, the devastation to reef ecosystems and the communities who rely on them led to my dedication to coral reef conservation.”

As a University of Hawai‘i at Manoa doctoral candidate, 2019 Honolulu ARCS Scholar Shayle Matsuda pioneered new molecular techniques to study symbioses between coral, algae and bacteria. He continues that work as part of an international coral reef restoration project under a 2021 David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellowship—a premier postdoctoral program in conservation science that supports early-career scientists and seeks solutions to the most pressing conservation challenges.